Blue Light Illuminates Sky In Queens As Explosion Rocks Con Edison Power Plant

The dazzling light was caused by a transformer explosion at a New York City power plant.

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ASTORIA, N.Y. — An electrical blast Thursday night at a power plant in the thickly populated Queens neighborhood turned the sky brilliant blue for a couple of minutes as inhabitants viewed in fear.

Not long after the impact, the New York Police Department educated occupants that the blue light was the aftereffect of a transformer blast at a Con Edison control plant.

Con Edison authorities took to Twitter to portray the occurrence as a “brief electrical fire” including electrical transformers, which caused a “transmission dunk in the territory.”

The fire caused no wounds, The Associated Press announced.

The blast affected tram benefit in the region and caused a short ground stop at LaGuardia Airport, which experienced power blackouts. Power was re-established around 30 minutes after the fact, the airplane terminal tweeted, and all flights continued.

New York Mayor Bill de Blasio said that deferrals ought not out of the ordinary on the Metropolitan Transportation Authority 7 train and at LaGuardia Airport.

New York fire authorities said they were examining the “transformer occurrence” in the wake of getting various reports of “blasts” in Long Island City and Astoria.

Inhabitants surged out to the roads as lights glimmered around the city. Inhabitants in New York City and neighboring zones started posting photographs of the amazing scene web-based, demonstrating a neon blue gleam radiating from the northwestern corner of Long Island.

Responding to photographs of the splendid presentation, web-based life clients thought about whether the blast was an outsider intrusion or a wellspring of superpowers.

Delegate Inspector Benjamin Gurley of NYPD’s 43rd Precinct immediately guaranteed occupants that there were no outsiders engaged with the episode, and the Fire Department of New York said in a tweet that the circumstance was under control.

When a utility employee pulled up in an SUV at 10:25 p.m. and asked one of the three NYPD officers at the entrance of the Astoria Generating Station if it was safe to go in, the officer nodded and waved the worker through the gate.

“I was so scared,” a 30-year-old man who said his name was Belkei and declined to give a last name told HuffPost.

He was standing nearby on 21st Street at 21st Avenue in the Ditmars Steinway neighborhood of New York City. “I thought it was a plane crash.”

A man who identified himself as Belkei, 30, photographed the explosion from 21st Street at 21st Avenue. “I thought
A man who identified himself as Belkin, 30, photographed the explosion from 21st Street at 21st Avenue. “I thought it was a plane crash,” he said.

New York fire authorities said they were exploring the “transformer occurrence” subsequent to getting various reports of “blasts” in Long Island City and Astoria.

Inhabitants hurried out to the boulevards as lights gleamed around the city. Occupants in New York City and neighboring regions started posting photographs of the stunning scene web-based, demonstrating a neon blue gleam radiating from the northwestern corner of Long Island.

Responding to photographs of the splendid presentation, online life clients thought about whether the blast was an outsider attack or a wellspring of superpowers.

Agent Inspector Benjamin Gurley of NYPD’s 43rd Precinct immediately guaranteed inhabitants that there were no outsiders associated with the episode, and the Fire Department of New York said in a tweet that the circumstance was under control.

“We really do need to think about how we collectively use energy and how we’re going to be moving forward as a state,” Ramos said. “That’s going to end up being a big role we’re going to play here to figure out what the future of this plant should be.”

 

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